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How Sleep Apnea Affects The Eyes

Did you know that some eye conditions are associated with sleep apnea? According to the National Sleep Foundation, more than 18 million Americans have sleep apnea, and Health Canada reports similar prevalence. It’s a sleep disorder where people stop breathing — often multiple times per night — while sleeping.

If you have sleep apnea: it tends to take longer for your tears to be replenished, you’re more likely to have ocular irritation, you have a higher chance of developing floppy eyelids, and you’re at increased risk for glaucoma.

What Is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

There are different types of sleep apnea. The most common one is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). During OSA, your airway becomes partially blocked due to relaxed muscles in your nose and throat. This causes apnea (the absence of breathing) or hypopnea (abnormally shallow, slow breathing). It’s twice as common in men, and is more likely to affect people with obesity, hypertension, diabetes or heart disease.

What are the common symptoms of sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea occurs when the muscles in the back of your throat relax too much to allow normal breathing. These temporary breathing lapses cause lower-quality sleep and affect the body’s oxygen supply, which can lead to potentially serious health consequences.

While snoring is a common symptom, not everyone who snores has sleep apnea. Interrupted sleep can cause excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, irritability or depression, headaches in the morning, difficulty concentrating and thinking, and a sore throat.

Which Eye Conditions Are Associated With Sleep Apnea?

Glaucoma

Glaucoma occurs when increased pressure within the eye damages the optic nerve, which connects the eye to the brain, leading to vision loss and sometimes blindness. In some cases, it might be due to a drop in blood oxygen levels, which happens when you stop breathing. However, CPAP machines, one of the most common treatments for sleep apnea, can also cause glaucoma.

So, people with sleep apnea — even if it’s being treated — need to get their eyes checked on a regular basis for glaucoma.

Floppy Eyelid Syndrome

Floppy Eyelid Syndrome (FES) is an eye condition where a person has an unusually large and floppy upper eyelid. It can cause eye redness, irritation, discharge, or blurry vision — and over 90% of people with FES also have sleep apnea.

Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

Non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is an eye condition that occurs when there is a loss of blood flow to the optic nerve. Patients typically complain of significant vision loss in one eye without any major pain. Approximately 70-80% of patients with NAION have been found to have OSA.

Retinal Vein Occlusion

Also referred to as an ‘eye stroke,’ retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a blockage of the small veins that carry blood away from the retina. A recent study of 114 RVO patients found that sleep apnea was suspected in 74% of the patients that had previously been diagnosed with RVO.

Other Eye Health Issues Associated With Sleep Apnea

Some other ocular conditions that are more common in patients with sleep apnea include: papilledema, keratoconus, and central serous chorioretinopathy. Furthermore, in addition to glaucoma mentioned above, CPAP machines are associated with dry eye syndrome and bacterial conjunctivitis.

Talk To Your Doc

Get eye exams regularly to rule out eye disorders and prevent potential vision loss, especially if you have been diagnosed with sleep apnea. At Premier Eye Center in Plantation we encourage you to share your medical history with us so we can better diagnose and treat any eye conditions or ocular diseases you may have, and help you keep your eyes nice and healthy.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Steve T. Bussa, O.D.

Q: What Causes Sleep Apnea?

  • A: Sleep apnea occurs when in-part or completely stop breathing when sleeping. This causes your lungs to strain harder for oxygen, and makes the brain send signals that jerk your body awake to resume proper breathing.

Q: What are the Warning Signs of Sleep Apnea?

  • A: A common sign of sleep apnea is loud snoring. Snoring that is loud enough to disturb the sleep of the patient as well as others around, even across the walls. That said, not everyone who snores suffers from obstructive sleep apnea.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Plantation, Florida. Visit Premier Eye Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

3 Benefits of Anti-Glare Coating

Glare refers to the excessive brightness caused by direct or reflected light. It can cause eye strain, digital eye strain (when using a computer, for example), halos, and headaches. Glare can also reduce visibility, making it unsafe to drive.

Anti-glare coating, also known as anti-reflective (AR) coating, is a thin layer applied to the surface of your eyeglass lenses that allows more light to pass through your lenses. By reducing the amount of glare that reflects off of your lenses, you can see more clearly and experience more comfortable vision. You can request anti-glare coating for lenses when you buy eyeglasses.

AR Coating Offers 3 Major Advantages

Better Appearance

Without an anti-glare coating on your glasses, camera flashes and bright lights can reflect off your lenses. This can hinder your appearance when speaking to people or in meetings, cause flash reflections when picture-taking, and make it difficult to find the right angle for video calls. Anti-reflective coating eliminates the harsh reflections and allows others to clearly see your eyes and face.

Reduced Digital Eye Strain

You know that tired, irritated feeling you get after staring at a digital screen for several hours? That’s digital eye strain. Anti-glare coating helps reduce digital eye strain by lowering exposure to excessive glare from digital devices and lighting.

Safe Driving at Night

The bright headlights from cars driving in the opposite direction can pose a serious danger when driving at night. These sudden glares can lead you to momentarily lose focus of the view ahead. AR coating on your prescription eyewear effectively reduces reflections from headlights at night, allowing you to enjoy a better view of the road and safer driving at night.

Let your eyes look and feel better every day with anti-glare coated lenses. Contact us to book your appointment today!

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Steve T. Bussa, O.D.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Plantation, Florida. Visit Premier Eye Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

What You Should Know About Night Blindness

If you don’t see well while driving at night, there’s a chance you have night blindness. Night blindness, or nyctalopia, is the inability to see well at night or in dim lighting. It’s not considered an eye disease, but rather a symptom of an underlying problem.

Our eye doctor in Plantation can help diagnose, manage and treat your night blindness with specialized digital eye exams, so that you can enjoy being out and about at night again.

Here are 4 things you should know about night blindness:

Causes of Night Blindness

The inability to see well at night can be the result of a condition such as:

  • Vitamin A Deficiency — Vitamin A helps keep your cornea, the layer at the front of your eye, clear; it’s also an important component of rhodopsin, a protein that enables you to see in low light conditions. Although uncommon in North America, deficiency of this vitamin can induce night blindness.
  • CataractsA buildup of protein clouds the eye’s lens, leading to impaired vision, especially at night and in poor lighting conditions.
  • Diabetic RetinopathyDamage to the eyes’ blood vessels and nerves can result in vision loss, including difficulty seeing at night.
  • GlaucomaThis group of eye diseases is associated with pressure build-up in the eye that damages the optic nerve. Both glaucoma and the medications used to treat it can cause night blindness.
  • MyopiaAlso called nearsightedness, myopia makes distant objects appear blurry, and patients with it describe a starburst effect around lights at night.
  • KeratoconusAn irregularly shaped cornea causes blurred vision and may involve sensitivity to light and glare which tend to be worse at night.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP)A progressive genetic eye disease which can be associated with other diseases, RP leads to night blindness and peripheral vision loss.
  • Usher SyndromeThis genetic condition causes both hearing loss and vision loss, including night blindness and RP, mentioned above.

Symptoms of Nyctalopia

Since night blindness is a symptom of some serious vision problems, it’s important to get your eyes checked regularly to ensure that everything is in good working order. Contact your eye doctor as soon as possible if you notice that you don’t see as well in dim light as you used to, such as when driving at night or when adjusting from being outdoors in the sunshine to being indoors.

Symptoms of Night Blindness Include:

  • Reduced contrast sensitivity
  • Difficulty seeing people outdoors at night
  • Difficulty seeing in places with dim lighting, like a movie theater
  • Trouble adapting to the dark while driving
  • Excessive squinting at night
  • Trouble adjusting from bright areas to darker ones

Treatments for Night Blindness

Your eye doctor will want to diagnose the cause of your night blindness in order to treat it. For example, in the rare case of vitamin A deficiency, it can be treated with vitamin supplements and vitamin-A rich foods; myopia can be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. Other conditions may require medications or surgery.

If night blindness is caused by a birth defect, Usher syndrome, or retinitis pigmentosa, low vision aids and devices can help you make the most of your remaining vision.

Prevention

While there is no proven way to prevent night blindness resulting from genetic conditions or birth defects, consuming healthy, nourishing foods and taking certain vitamin supplements may prevent or slow the onset of some eye conditions that cause night blindness.

If you experience poor vision at night or in dim lighting, we can help. Contact Premier Eye Center in Plantation to schedule your appointment today.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Steve T. Bussa, O.D.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Plantation, Florida. Visit Premier Eye Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

6 Common Myths About Glaucoma

Glaucoma is an eye disease in which increased pressure causes progressive, permanent vision loss and even blindness. Unfortunately, many misconceptions about the disease can leave you misinformed. Below we sort fact from fiction by debunking 6 of the most common glaucoma myths.

Glaucoma Facts vs. Myths

MYTH 1: Glaucoma is a single disease

FACT

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases; the most common ones are open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and angle-closure glaucoma (ACG).

In open-angle glaucoma, the drainage structure in your eye (called the trabecular meshwork) doesn’t allow the fluid inside the eye to flow out as it should, causing an increase in internal ocular pressure that damages the optic nerve. OAG develops slowly, and usually by the time people perceive symptoms, such as peripheral vision loss, they already have optic nerve damage.

In angle-closure glaucoma, the eye doesn’t drain fluid as it should because the drainage channel between your iris and cornea becomes too narrow, causing increased eye pressure. This pressure damages the optic nerve, leading to vision loss. ACG can occur suddenly or gradually.

MYTH 2: Only the elderly suffer from glaucoma

FACT

Although it’s true that people over 60 are at a greater risk of developing open-angle glaucoma compared to people in their 40s, there are other types of glaucoma that can affect people aged 20 to 50 and even young infants (due to abnormal ocular development).

In addition to age, those with a higher risk of developing glaucoma include:

  • African Americans and Hispanics
  • Individuals with a family history of glaucoma
  • Patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or sickle cell anemia
  • Those who have previously sustained an eye injury
  • People taking steroid medications over the long term

MYTH 3: Glaucoma shows symptoms early on

FACT

The most common form of glaucoma, open-angle glaucoma, shows virtually no signs or symptoms until its later stages when vision loss sets in. Despite what people may think, the increased eye pressure causes no pain. And since peripheral vision is the first to go, you may not recognize vision loss until your vision has become significantly impaired. The only way to detect glaucoma is to undergo a comprehensive eye exam.

MYTH 4: Nothing can be done once you have glaucoma

FACT

While there’s currently no cure for glaucoma, many effective treatment options exist: eye drops, oral medications, as well as laser and surgical procedures that can help slow glaucoma progression. Each treatment option is used to get the fluid to flow properly out of the eye, reducing pressure inside the eye and decreasing damage to the optic nerve.

MYTH 5: Testing for glaucoma is painful

FACT

Actually, testing for glaucoma is practically painless. One of the tests includes a non-contact device that blows a gentle puff of air into each eye to test the intraocular pressure. The sound of the puff may be startling, but it’s over in a second and is painless. With the Goldmann applanation tonometry test, an anesthetic eye drop is inserted into each eye, which may cause a stinging sensation for a few seconds. Your eye doctor will then use a blue light to quickly and gently touch the cornea to precisely measure intraocular pressure. The most accurate of all, however, are visual field testing and OCT (optical coherence tomography), non-invasive imaging, both of which are also painless.

MYTH 6: You can’t prevent glaucoma

FACT

Regular eye exams are the only way to prevent glaucoma, as blindness or significant vision loss can be prevented if the disease is diagnosed and treated in the early stages. That’s why routine comprehensive eye exams which include glaucoma testing are so important.

Getting your eyes checked regularly can ensure that any existing eye problems are detected early enough to prevent or slow ocular damage. Contact Premier Eye Center in Plantation to book your comprehensive eye exam today!

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Steve T. Bussa, O.D.

Q: If one of my parents has glaucoma, does that mean I will develop it as well at some point?

  • A: Having a parent with glaucoma does not mean that the child will automatically develop the condition too. However, those people with an immediate family history (parents, siblings) of glaucoma are at more risk to develop this disease. Patients should have a comprehensive eye examination each year to evaluate the health of the eyes and to look for signs of glaucoma. Some of these signs can be an increase in the pressure of the eyes as well as changes to the appearance of the optic nerve. Many times there are no symptoms noticed by the patient. If there is suspicion of glaucoma, more frequent visits to the eye doctor along with additional nerve testing are often required.

Q: Why do I need to scan my retinas/back of the eye?

  • A: The retina shows us a lot about the overall ocular health as well as systemic conditions that can affect the eyes. Often diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol can be observed from a retinal scan. Also, retinal scans allow us to diagnose and treat macular degeneration and glaucoma. Scans are often very important for a complete eye check up.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Plantation, Florida. Visit Premier Eye Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

Cataracts treatment in Boca Raton, Symptoms and causes

Will removing cataracts improve vision

Cataract extraction surgery

Cataracts are a common age-related eye disorder. In fact, statistics estimate that over half of the population in America over age 80 have experienced cataracts or cataract surgery! As you get older, so does the lens structure in your eyes. Sometimes the crystalline fibers of your eye’s lens change and lead to the formation of a cataract, which is a clouding of the lens. Clear images are thereby preventing from appearing on your retina, and blurred vision results.

At Premier Eye Center, we’ll examine the health of your eyes thoroughly to inspect for signs of cataract formation. If we detect a cataract during your comprehensive eye exam in Boca Raton,Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida, we’ll refer you immediately to a qualified, respected surgeon. At present, surgery is the only certain cure to treat cataracts, and we’re experienced and competent at handling all of your pre- and post-operative care.

Schedule Regular Eye Exams

Sometimes cataracts are mild enough that cataract surgery isn’t recommended yet. If that’s the case, then you need to be vigilant about making sure you return to your nearby optometrist in Boca Raton,Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida for regular eye exams. Follow-up evaluations of your ocular health are the only way to keep tabs on the cataract, which may be worsening. Once it obstructs your vision and interferes with normal day-to-day life, Dr. Bussa may decide it’s time to remove the cataract.

What is cataract surgery?

Cataracts are a common eye disorder associated primarily with aging. As you get older, so does the structure of the eye’s lens. Presently, cataract surgery is the only certain cure to treat this condition, and this popular procedure enjoys a very high success rate.

During this surgery, the opaque natural lens of your eye will removed and your eye surgeon will replace it with artificial transparent intraocular lens. Local anesthesia is used and little discomfort is caused; 90% of all cataract operations restore clear vision.

At Premier Eye Center, our Boca Raton optometrists will check your eye health comprehensively. If we diagnose a cataract during your eye exam, we will refer you to a qualified, respected eye surgeon in the area.

Preparing for Cataract Surgery

There are a variety of types of IOL’s (artificial intraocular lens) available, with different features. To determine the best option for you, it’s advised to discuss the benefits and risks of each type with your eye doctor or optometrist.

About a week before your scheduled surgery, an ultrasound test will be done to measure the shape and size of your eye. The procedure is relatively quick and totally painless. These measurements will help decide upon the most appropriate type of IOL.

You may be advised to discontinue specific medications prior to cataract surgery, in case they raise your risk of bleeding during the procedure. To decrease risk of infection, antibiotic eye drops may also be prescribed for a few days. From 12 hours before the surgery, you may also be instructed not to eat or drink.

What to Expect During Cataract Surgery

Start to finish, the entire procedure generally takes one hour or less and is done on an outpatient basis. We’ll walk you through the basic steps of what to expect:

  1. Your eye doctor will insert dilating eye drops and you’ll be given local anesthetics to numb the eye region. You may also be prescribed a relaxing sedative that will make you groggy, but not put you to sleep.
  2. The clouded lens will be removed and an artificial, clear IOL will be implanted. The implant is composed of either plastic, silicone or acrylic, and you will not be able to feel, see or sense it in your eye. It becomes a permanent part of your care and needs no care.
  3. Immediately after the surgery, your vision will likely be blurry. This should improve within a couple of days, as your eye heals. You will not be able to drive yourself home after the surgery, so be sure to arrange a ride. You may also need help for about a week, for activities such as lifting and bending may be limited by your doctor.

What to Expect After Cataract Surgery

Within a day or two after the procedure, you’ll need to return for a follow-up eye exam with a member of the optometry team in our Hoffman Estates office. We are trained to provide quality co-management for cataract surgery.

Mild discomfort and itching are common complaints, and it’s important to refrain from rubbing or pushing on your eye. You may be given a protective shield or eye patch to wear on the first day, or for a few days after the surgery. Medicated eye drops may also be prescribed. Expect your complete course of healing to take about eight weeks.

This is a very common, safe procedure, and cataract surgery complications are not typical. If complications do arise, they are usually treated easily. Some possible risks include bleeding, infection, swelling, retinal detachment, glaucoma and loss of vision. If you have another ocular disease or serious medical condition, your chance of complications is higher.

The vast majority of people who undergo cataract surgery enjoy restored, clear vision as a result!

Make an appointment to see our local eye care proffessional in Boca Raton,Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida. Today!

Our team of experienced optometrists will use many different testing procedures to check your eyes. Our Boca Raton, office is fully equipped with the latest equipment. To determine visual acuity, you will be asked to read a standard eye chart and we will check refractive error. To diagnose or rule out any eye diseases, we will inspect your inner eye tissues with a high-powered lens. This exam also provides significant information about your overall health.

For more information about comprehensive eye examinations Call Premier Eye Center on (561) 325-6634 in Boca Raton, Florida to schedule an eye exam with our optometrist, Dr. Bussa.

Have you read about LASIK, Laser eye surgery Co-Management ?

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LASIK & Laser Eye Surgery in Boca Raton, How It Works and the Risks

Premier Eye Center LASIK, Laser eye surgery Co-Management Boca Raton, Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida

What is LASIK or Laser eye surgery?

LASIK refractive surgery is an advanced and contemporary way to decrease or eliminate your need for eyeglasses and contact lenses. During this laser procedure, your eye surgeon will direct the cool light of an excimer laser to reshape your cornea in order to correct any refractive error. LASIK can thereby resolve your nearsightedness – leaving you with sharp vision without eyewear. In general, the results are outstanding and many of our Boca Raton, Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida, patients enjoy crisp and clear vision after the surgery.

Why is LASIK so popular?

LASIK holds certain advantages over other vision correction procedures, such as a quick surgery, almost immediate results and minimal pain or discomfort after the surgery.

LASIK is also suitable for both nearsighted and farsighted people. If you are nearsighted, your eye surgeon will flatten the cornea appropriately, and if you are farsighted, your cornea will be made steeper. Once your cornea is reshaped properly, it functions more efficiently to focus light into the eye and onto the retina. The end result is clearer vision.

Am I a good candidate for LASIK surgery?

To determine your candidacy for these laser eye surgeries, visit our optometrists for a thorough eye exam and consultation. We will inspect your ocular health and vision condition to verify that there are no contraindications. Our team will also discuss your visual expectations and goals to make sure that they are appropriate.

A preoperative LASIK consultation includes:

  • Review of your eye history
  • Assessment of your refractive stability
  • Counseling about various options for refractive surgery
  • Testing of eye dominancy
  • Inspection of cornea and eye health
  • Testing your current refraction and vision prescription

After your preoperative consultation, we will advise you as to whether or not surgery is a good option. If the decision is made to proceed with surgery, all of your information will be forwarded to a recommended eye surgeon.

What is LASIK Co-Management?

LASIK co-management is a helpful and essential service that our optometrists provide before and after your LASIK surgery. We will work together with your eye surgeon to make sure that you receive comprehensive instructions and information about LASIK, as well as first-rate eye care when you need it.

Our co-management services for LASIK consist of the following parts:

  1. Consultation: our Boca Raton, Florida, eye doctors will explain the surgery to you, with a full discussion of the benefits and risks. We invite you to ask all your questions, and we’ll answer them patiently. To check your candidacy for LASIK, you will also need a comprehensive eye exam, during which we will assess your corneal thickness and curvature, tear film, vision prescription, and the structure of your eyelids. If the results determine that you are a good candidate for LASIK, we will refer you to a top eye surgeon nearby.
  2. Pre-operative eye care: our optometrist will assist you to arrange your LASIK surgery with the eye surgeon, and we will handle your complete pre-op check-up. During this appointment, we will also provide clear instructions for the day of your LASIK procedure, tell you what to expect, and explain the healing process.
  3. Post-operative eye care: most patients need to visit our Boca Raton, Florida, eye doctor on the day following your LASIK surgery. We will check to make sure that your eyes are healing properly. After this initial eye exam, you will need to return to our office for regular examinations throughout the next few weeks and months.

Why Do I Need LASIK Co-Management?

There are numerous benefits to visiting our office for co-management, as opposed to using only your eye surgeon for all preoperative and postoperative care. Look at these advantages:

  • Comprehensive information: your Boca Raton, optometrist will take the time to respond to your questions, as well as give you detailed guidance and reassurance. Many eye surgeons do not have the time to provide this type of patient care.
  • Convenience: all of your appointments will be held in our comfortable and pleasant local clinic, so you won’t need to travel far or spend extra time in an impersonal hospital setting.
  • Personalized eye care: you will receive attention from an experienced and compassionate eye doctor who knows you and is familiar with your eye health and history.
  • Affordable and accessible care: our office is open during the hours that you need, five days a week. If you experience any problems, you can contact us for immediate, affordable assistance.

LASIK co-management will transform your whole experience of laser refractive surgery into a smooth process. From deciding whether or not to have the procedure to providing medical care while your eyes heal, our Boca Raton, Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida, eye doctors will guide you through every step, from start to finish.

Make an appointment to see our local eye care proffessional in Boca Raton,Plantation & West Palm Beach, Florida. Today!

Our team of experienced optometrists will use many different testing procedures to check your eyes. Our Boca Raton, office is fully equipped with the latest equipment. To determine visual acuity, you will be asked to read a standard eye chart and we will check refractive error. To diagnose or rule out any eye diseases, we will inspect your inner eye tissues with a high-powered lens. This exam also provides significant information about your overall health.

For more information about comprehensive eye examinations Call Premier Eye Center on (561) 325-6634 in Boca Raton, Florida to schedule an eye exam with our optometrist, Dr. Bussa.

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Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Press Release – Premier Eye Center Trunk Shows

RenovationsCome join us at one (or more) of our eyeglass and eyeglass frame trunk shows. We are excited to celebrate our newly renovated and updated optometrist offices in Plantation and West Palm Beach! Depending on where you live and which time and office is most convenient for you, join us for one of Premier Eye Center’s three trunk shows. The first trunk show will be in Premier Eye Center’s Plantation office located at 7045 W Broward Blvd Plantation, FL on Saturday, April 21 from 9:30 until 3:30 pm or to our West Plam Beach office located at 3650 Forest Hill Blvd, Suite 2 in West Palm Beach, FL on Saturday, May 5 from 9:00 am until 3:30 pm or our Boca Raton office located at 7840 Glades Rd, Suite 245 Boca Raton, FL on Saturday, June 2 from 9:00 am until 3:30 pm. Or you can come to all three Premier Eye Center trunk shows. sale with hearts horizontal

Your South Florida eye doctors will have representatives from some of your favorite eyeglass frame designers at the various trunk shows to showcase new eyeglass frames and will be able to answer your questions. There will be giveaways for everyone, different ones at each trunk show! Of course, we will be having a local vendor showing their food to satisfy your hunger while you satisfy your thirst for new designer glasses and eyeglass frames!

If you have been to one of our Premier Eye Center’s offices before, then you should have received an email with various coupon codes printed on it for additional discounts to utilize at the trunk shows. Please do not forget to bring the coupon codes with you to receive the discount. If you did not receive an email with coupon codes or otherwise are not on our email list and would like to be added to it in order to receive emails with discounts and other announcements, please click here. Premier Eye Center’s eye doctors and opticians look forward to greeting you at one of our trunk shows soon!Slide

All About Comprehensive Eye Exams for Prescription Contact Lenses

Contact lenses are popular for a number of reasons, ranging from comfort and convenience to crisper vision. When it comes to appearance, many people feel more attractive and confident facing the world without eyeglasses in the way. Additionally, there’s no need to turn your head for sharp peripheral vision with contacts. Sports players find this to be a distinct advantage! Another benefit is contact lenses never slip down your nose on a hot day. So, now that you’re convinced and want to wear prescription contact lenses, you may be wondering where can I get quality contact lenses near me?

In addition to our user-friendly site to order contacts online, we stock a full inventory of premium contact lenses in our optometry offices in Plantation, Boca Raton, and West Palm Beach, Florida. If you have a current vision prescription, we invite you to replenish your supply of contacts from Premier Eye Center! However, if you’ve never worn contacts or you haven’t had a comprehensive eye exam in over a year – we encourage you to visit your eye doctor for a thorough evaluation before purchasing new lenses.

What happens during a comprehensive eye exam for contact lenses?

When you visit our eye care clinics for an eye exam for contacts, we will assess much more than your visual acuity. Your eye examination will evaluate overall ocular health to rule out or diagnose any conditions that could interfere with wearing lenses. We will also verify that you receive the correct lens powers for optimal vision. Be aware that your vision prescription for eyeglasses is not always the same for contact lenses.

Once we determine your precise vision prescription and decide that you’re a good candidate for wearing contacts, we will measure your eyes for contact lenses.

What measurements are taken for a contact lens fitting?

Just as people come in different sizes, so do eyes! Your optometrist will need to take detailed measurements of your eyes to fit you with the best contact lenses. Wearing contacts that don’t fit well can lead to blurred vision, pain, and damage to your eyes.

Using a keratometer, our eye doctor will measure your corneal curvature (the front surface of your eye) to ensure that your lens sits smoothly on your eye. If you have astigmatism, your cornea is not perfectly rounded, and you will require a specialty toric lens. In the event that you have a very irregular corneal curvature, we may use corneal topography to map the surface precisely.

Other measurements that we may calculate to fit your contact lenses include the size of your pupil or iris. We will use a slit lamp (biomicroscope) or measure manually with a card or ruler. These numbers are particularly significant for wearing rigid gas permeable (GP) contact lenses.

Can I wear contact lenses with dry eyes?

Yes, you generally can – as long as you wear the right type of contact lenses! Due to the development of new, modern materials, there is a variety of contact lens types for dry eyes.

Dry eyes are a common, contemporary problem that can affect comfortable contact lens wear. If your lenses are not kept moist enough by your natural tear film, they can lead to eye irritation, dryness, and itchy eyes. During your comprehensive eye exam for contact lenses, your eye doctor will administer a tear film evaluation. If you do not have enough tears or their composition is poor, we will recommend certain contacts for dry eyes, which maintain moisture more efficiently.

What’s better – daily disposable lenses or monthly lenses?

Your lifestyle and personal preferences are an important consideration when we recommend the most appropriate type of lenses for you. Tell us your hobbies, activities, daily routine and health considerations – we want to know all about you!

We’ll weigh all of this information to decide whether you’ll do best with soft contact lenses, rigid gas permeable lenses, daily lenses or monthly. If you have a particular eye condition, such as dry eye syndrome or astigmatism, we will prescribe the most appropriate type and brand of contacts to provide ultimate comfort and sharp vision. Patients over 40 who have trouble reading small print will be pleased to know that we also offer multifocal contact lenses in our offices in Plantation, Boca Raton, and West Palm Beach, FL.

Don’t Forget Follow-up Eye Exams

It is critical to return regularly for comprehensive eye exams with our eye doctor to assess the fit and condition of your contacts, as well as your ocular health. If you experience any discomfort or dry eyes with contacts, visit immediately for a check-up. Your eye doctor may recommend a change in the type of contact lens and/or your wearing schedule, or a change in the type of disinfecting solution you are using.

Next time you need to order contacts online, book an eye exam before you click! Changes in your eye health and vision can occur before you notice any symptoms, and without the proper fit, prescription or hygiene, contact lenses can cause damage. Professional eye exams are the best way to preserve your lasting, healthy vision!

Got a Shiner!

What Exactly Is a Black Eye?

A black eye, also known as a periorbital hematoma, is usually not an injury of the actual eye (which is why it is called “periorbital”- around the eye). It typically occurs when there is an injury to the face or the eye socket which causes bleeding beneath the skin and bruising. The term, “black eye” comes from the dark coloring of the bruising that occurs underneath the skin around the eye.

When a blunt force hits the eye socket, this can cause capillaries in the area to burst, causing hemorrhaging, also known as a hematoma. This blood can accumulate in the eye socket and as it begins to be reabsorbed into the surrounding tissues, the colors of the bruising begin to change. That’s why you will often notice the coloring of the black eye to go from a dark purplish-red color to brownish and then yellow. 

Sometimes along with the external bruising, you might also notice a small amount of bleeding on the white surface of the eye, which is called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This is when the tiny blood vessels on the white sclera are broken and leak blood. It’s generally harmless but sometimes looks scarier to the patient than the black eye does. This condition will also reabsorb on its own and is nothing to be concerned about. 

While most black eyes can look pretty serious due to the dramatic color, an uncomplicated black eye will typically heal within a week to ten days. If it doesn’t, there could be a more serious issue such as a bone fracture or an orbital blowout fracture.This could present with restricted eye movement, especially if looking up or down, and numbness of the cheek and/or upper lip on the same side as the black eye. The eye may even appear sunken in. Further, if there is bleeding within the actual eye (called a hyphema) or floaters or flashes in the vision, then it is definitely advisable to see your eye doctor as soon as possible. These could be signs of more serious damage such a corneal or retinal damage and can lead to vision loss. 

Treatment for a Black Eye

Usually, the best treatment for a black eye is to apply a cold compress (or even better, a bag of frozen vegetables, which is more flexible and can conform to the contours of the face) directly on the area. The cold will reduce swelling and constrict capillaries to reduce internal bleeding as well. Apply the cold for about 15-20 minutes every hour.  If there is pain, over the counter pain medications can help. 

If however, you experience any of the following symptoms, you should seek medical attention:

  • Blood on the surface of the eye or a visible incision on the eye
  • Vision changes such as double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision or the appearance of floaters
  • Loss of consciousness, dizziness or fainting
  • Loss of eye movement
  • Persistent headaches
  • Blood or fluids coming from the ears or nose
  • Vomiting
  • Signs of infection such as excessive swelling, pus, redness or a fever
  • Severe pain

In addition to blunt trauma, black eyes can be caused by sinus infections, nasal or eye surgery or other infections in the area such as the teeth infections or cellulitis (a serious infection that can occur around the eyes). A skull fracture can also cause both eyes to turn black, sometimes known as raccoon eyes. 

Unless you notice any severe symptoms you can rest assured that your black eye is a bruise just like anywhere else on the body and with a little care, rest and patience, it will clear up in no time. 





Got a Shiner!


A black eye, also known as a periorbital hematoma, is usually not an injury of the actual eye (which is why it is called “periorbital”- around the eye). It typically occurs when there is an injury to the face or the eye socket which causes bleeding beneath the skin and bruising. The term, “black eye” comes from the dark coloring of the bruising that occurs underneath the skin around the eye.

When a blunt force hits the eye socket, this can cause capillaries in the area to burst, causing hemorrhaging, also known as a hematoma. This blood can accumulate in the eye socket and as it begins to be reabsorbed into the surrounding tissues, the colors of the bruising begin to change. That’s why you will often notice the coloring of the black eye to go from a dark purplish-red color to brownish and then yellow.

Sometimes along with the external bruising, you might also notice a small amount of bleeding on the white surface of the eye, which is called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This is when the tiny blood vessels on the white sclera are broken and leak blood. It’s generally harmless but sometimes looks scarier to the patient than the black eye does. This condition will also reabsorb on its own and is nothing to be concerned about.

While most black eyes can look pretty serious due to the dramatic color, an uncomplicated black eye will typically heal within a week to ten days. If it doesn’t, there could be a more serious issue such as a bone fracture or an orbital blowout fracture.This could present with restricted eye movement, especially if looking up or down, and numbness of the cheek and/or upper lip on the same side as the black eye. The eye may even appear sunken in. Further, if there is bleeding within the actual eye (called a hyphema) or floaters or flashes in the vision, then it is definitely advisable to see your eye doctor as soon as possible. These could be signs of more serious damage such a corneal or retinal damage and can lead to vision loss.

Treatment for a Black Eye

Usually, the best treatment for a black eye is to apply a cold compress (or even better, a bag of frozen vegetables, which is more flexible and can conform to the contours of the face) directly on the area. The cold will reduce swelling and constrict capillaries to reduce internal bleeding as well. Apply the cold for about 15-20 minutes every hour. If there is pain, over the counter pain medications can help.

If however, you experience any of the following symptoms, you should seek medical attention:

– Blood on the surface of the eye or a visible incision on the eye
– Vision changes such as double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision or the appearance of floaters
– Loss of consciousness, dizziness or fainting
– Loss of eye movement
– Persistent headaches
– Blood or fluids coming from the ears or nose
– Vomiting
– Signs of infection such as excessive swelling, pus, redness or a fever
– Severe pain

In addition to blunt trauma, black eyes can be caused by sinus infections, nasal or eye surgery or other infections in the area such as the teeth infections or cellulitis (a serious infection that can occur around the eyes). A skull fracture can also cause both eyes to turn black, sometimes known as raccoon eyes.

Unless you notice any severe symptoms you can rest assured that your black eye is a bruise just like anywhere else on the body and with a little care, rest and patience, it will clear up in no time.

Why Do We Need Glasses?

clipart-010The most well-known part of a comprehensive eye exam is the basic vision test. When you have a general vision test, one of the main conditions the eye care practitioner is checking for is a refractive error. A refractive error means there is an abnormality in the shape of the eye, changing the eye’s ability to focus light directly onto the retina.This causes blurred vision and can usually be corrected by wearing prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses and possibly, alternate treatments such as vision therapy, ortho-k, LASIK or refractive surgery such as LASIK.

 

The term, “refractive error” refers to a problem with the process of refraction that is responsible for sight. Normally, light rays that enter your eye are refracted or bent through the cornea and the lens, and ultimately converge or are focused onto a single point on the retina. From the retina, messages are sent through the optic nerve to the brain which then interprets these signals into the image that we are seeing.

 

In order for this process to work effectively, the anatomy of the eye including the length of the eye and the curvature of the cornea and the lens must be just right to be able to focus the light onto the retina. When this is not the case, a refractive error will occur.

 

There are several different types of refractive errors, depending on which part of the eye is affected, and it is possible to have multiple refractive errors at the same time:

Myopia or nearsightedness:

In myopia the length of the eyeball is too long which results in light coming to a focus in front of the retina, rather than on the retina. This allows the individual to see well when objects are close but not clearly when looking at objects at a distance.

 

Hyperopia or farsightedness:

Hyperopia is when the eyeball is shorter than normal and can result in near objects being blurry. However, people experience hyperopia differently. Sometimes distant objects are clear while other times people may experience overall blurred vision near and far or no problems at all. In children particularly, the lens may accommodate for the error allowing for clear vision but may cause fatigue and sometimes crossed eyes or strabismus. Hyperopia causes eyestrain or fatigue especially when looking at near objects for a period of time. Often people with 20/20 vision may still need glasses at their desk to relax their eyes and improve concentration.

 

Astigmatism:

Astigmatism is usually the result of an irregularly shaped cornea (although it can sometimes also be due to a misshapen lens). The cornea, which is normally round, is more football-shaped in an eye with astigmatism, resulting in multiple focus points either in front of the retina or behind it (or both). People with astigmatism usually have blurred or distorted vision to some degree at all distances, near and far.

Presbyopia:

Presbyopia is an age-related condition which usually begins to appear sometime after 40. As the eye begins to age, the lens stiffens and can no longer focus clearly on objects that are close.

 

It’s important to note that presbyopia is often confused with hyperopia, as both cause problems focusing at near distances. However, high hyperopia can also cause blur at far distances as well, especially in dim lighting, and depth perception problems can result in motor vehicle accidents. In these instances people with hyperopia could use glasses at any distance.

If you are having trouble seeing, it is important to have an eye exam to determine the cause of the problem and to effectively correct your vision. Even if your vision is fine, you should schedule a routine eye exam on a regular basis to ensure that your eyes are healthy and that any potential problems are caught early.